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These Six Fall fruits and vegetables are great Immunity Boosters

These Six Fall fruits and vegetables are great Immunity Boosters

by Sara Vogt - October 25, 2022

These six fall fruits and vegetables are great immunity boosters we can add to our daily meal planning!

Cranberries are in season during autumn from September through October, and the berries can be refrigerated for about two months and frozen for longer. Fresh cranberries offer the most reception for the body and can be the toppings for yogurt, oats, or whole wheat cereal. Cranberries can also be blended with smoothies, baked in muffins or cookies, dried out and eaten as snacks. One could also eat cranberries in a sauce by melting them in a pot with sugar and water until it reaches a thick liquid consistency. Cranberries are best eaten raw, but cranberry sauce is a fall season staple and can still be enjoyed in any desired form. Cranberries are primarily made up of carbs and fiber, and they also boast several vitamins and minerals, including manganese, copper, and vitamins C, E, and K1.

Sweet potatoes are high in fiber and antioxidants, which protect your body from free radical damage and promote a healthy gut and brain. They’re also incredibly rich in beta-carotene, converted to vitamin A to support good vision and your immune system. In an article in ‘have a plant,’ they encourage us to try munching on sweet potato chips. Thinly slice a large sweet potato and brush lightly with olive oil. Bake at 350 degrees for 15 minutes or until lightly browned and crisp.

Pumpkins aren’t just for decorating in the fall; there are many uses for us to consider in a healthy diet – even the seeds are beneficial! Many seeds, including pumpkin seeds, are high sources of vitamin E, which helps the immune system. You can also add roasted pumpkin cubes to your favorite salad. How about Pumpkin muffins? How about pumpkin soup? Here is a recipe to try https://fruitsandveggies.org/stories/30-minute-pumpkin-soup/

Pomegranates! I love them! :) Pomegranates are a superfood that provides a concentrated source of antioxidants and phytochemicals that protect your heart, brain, and body. The edible capsule around the seeds also provides vitamins B6, C, and potassium. Pomegranates are in season from September to January. You can eat them alone or throw them into a salad or on top of your yogurt.

Mushrooms are available year-round, but they are in peak season during the fall and winter months. Mushrooms are a good source of antioxidant selenium, the only fruit or vegetable that naturally contains vitamin D, and they are a good source of several B vitamins. There are twelve different types of mushrooms for you to try and enjoy! They are the button, cup, flat, swiss brown, portabella, dried shitake, enoki, oyster, king oyster, shimeji, pine, and dried porcini. Research has shown that the best way to cook mushrooms while preserving their nutritional properties is to grill or microwave them, as the fried and boiled mushrooms showed significantly less antioxidant activity.

We have all heard an apple a day keeps the doctor away! Maybe! Some of the nutrients in apples may aid in digestive health, help to reduce cholesterol, and reduce the risk of cancer and heart disease. You can check out this website for news about apple varieties! My favorite apple is the Honeycrisp!

https://usapple.org/apple-varieties

Credits:

Writing: Sara Vogt

Produced by Vogt Media
Home Page Sponsors: Laurel Health Centers

 
 
 
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