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The Eaton Calendar – January 27, 2021

The Eaton Calendar – January 27, 2021

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - January 27, 2021

  1. EMMF Releases Free Corky Siegel Music Video Today, Wednesday, Jan. 27
  2. HG Seeks People Interested in Performing in 30-Minute Plays for Pre-recorded Series; No Memorization Required
  3. Maloney to Give Presentation on Chesapeake Bay Watershed Research at TU Chapter #688’s Zoom Meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 2
  4. Register Now for The Free Astronomical Highlights of 2021 Virtual Program Being Held Friday, Feb. 5
  5. Mt. Tom Challenge for Runners and Hikers is Sunday, Feb. 14

Diane Eaton
dianetn@ptd.net
(570) 724-3800

EMMF RELEASES FREE CORKY SIEGEL MUSIC VIDEO TODAY, WEDNESDAY, JAN. 27

Today, Wednesday, Jan. 27, the Endless Mountain Music Festival is releasing a free music video by Corky Siegel, a Chicago native who “has earned an international reputation as one of the world’s great blues harmonica masters.”

This is the third in a series of music videos that are being released on consecutive Wednesdays and feature some of EMMF audiences’ favorite guest artists.

Siegel’s video performance is free and beginning today (Jan. 27) can be viewed anytime on the EMMF website at www.endlessmountain.net.

Not only is Siegel a harmonica virtuoso, but also a composer, blues pianist and singer. In 1964 at the age of 21, he and Jim Schwall formed the legendary Siegel-Schwall Band which was Instrumental in the Great Blues Revival of the 60s and 70s.

Throughout his career, he has broken musical boundaries and is credited with wiping out the distinction between classical and blues music and creating an original musical genre.

On stage, whether he plays the harmonica or the piano, is performing solo, with an ensemble or an orchestra, Siegel generates excitement, energy and lots of applause.

He has performed at three EMMF festivals. The first was in 2007 when Siegel and the festival orchestra performed a piece he had written titled “Symphonic Blues.” He wowed audiences again when he returned for the 10th anniversary in 2015 and the following year (2016). Siegel will be back in 2022.

On the video are six songs Siegel wrote. “Something’s Wrong” is a blues-based polka he performs with the Siegel-Schwall Band. It ends with Siegel doing a harmonica-piano improv. “Counter Intuitive” is a piece that features Siegel and his Chamber Blues Ensemble performing his juxtaposed classical and blues music. Siegel sings and plays harmonica on “Deja Vous”, a blues-based shuffle that was filmed in Australia at his sister’s home. For “Am I Wrong About You”, a blues piece, Siegel plays piano and sings. “Seven Hands on the Piano” is played boogie style by the Chamber Blues Ensemble with Siegel at the piano. “Opus 17 – Complimentary Colors” features Siegel playing blues on the harmonica and a string quartet playing the classical portion.

The seventh song is “Billie Jean” written by Siegel and Jim Post featuring country blues-style harmonica and vocals.

Also on the video, Siegel welcomes viewers into his home and talks about why performances today may be different but better.

Being released next week on Wednesday, Feb. 3, is the fourth music video featuring swing, jazz and stride pianist Bram Wijnands, a festival favorite.

For tickets to this summer’s concerts, call the Endless Mountain Music Festival Box Office at (570) 787-7800 or visit www.endlessmountain.net.


Photo provided
Corky Siegel performs on the harmonica with the orchestra during the 2016 Endless Mountain Music Festival.

HG SEEKS PEOPLE INTERESTED IN PERFORMING IN 30-MINUTE PLAYS FOR PRE-RECORDED SERIES; NO MEMORIZATION REQUIRED

Hamilton-Gibson Productions has announced a new series of script dialogues to be presented on Zoom weekly beginning in February.

All performances will be “staged readings” so no memorization is required. There will be a few zoomed rehearsals and then one recording session at the Deane Center in Wellsboro. “The plays selected will range from gentle comedies to challenging dramas as well as poignant monologues,” said Thomas Putnam, artistic director for the Wellsboro-baed community performing arts group. “Cast size for each will be minimal, usually not more than three people. Characters will represent a wide range of ages, and we are encouraging those of all races, faiths, genders and political affiliations to participate,” Putnam said.

“We’ve been exploring ways to produce live theatre and provide opportunities for people to interact safely,” said Putnam. “This series is a hybrid of sorts. The basic plan is that we will record a 30-minute play or a few shorter plays totaling 30 minutes and present the play or plays on Zoom on a Saturday and Sunday. We may be presenting as many as eight different pre-taped 30-minute shows. Following each presentation, there will be an opportunity for those who have joined the Zoom call to talk about the script or performance with the cast, director and others on the call. It feels like a viable solution to what we can do with live theatre in our community with safety guidelines in place,” said Putnam.

Anyone interested in being part of one of the 30-minute shows can call Hamilton-Gibson at (570) 724-2079 or email hamgib@gmail.com for more information.

MALONEY TO GIVE PRESENTATION ON CHESAPEAKE BAY WATERSHED RESEARCH AT TU CHAPTER #688’s ZOOM MEETING ON TUESDAY, FEB. 2

At 6:30 p.m., this coming Tuesday, February 2, Trout Unlimited Tiadaghton Chapter #688 based in Wellsboro is meeting via Zoom. Officers, members and the public are invited to attend. For information on how to join the meeting, contact President Jere White by calling 570-662-2167 or emailing him at whitesgordonsetters@gmail.com.

This Zoom meeting will open with White demonstrating how to tie a Pine Squirrel Trout Spey Streamer. Few patterns are more effective in catching trout than this flashy streamer used with the Spey casting technique.

Following will be a presentation by Kelly O. Maloney, PhD, research ecologist with the USGS Leetown Science Center in West Virginia and the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Maryland. He will share information about research he has been doing about the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.

Maloney had worked at the now closed USGS Northern Appalachian Research Laboratory at 176 Straight Run Road in Asaph, eight miles west of Wellsboro.

The title of Maloney’s talk is “Assessing the potential effects of land use and climate change on future stream conditions in the Chesapeake Bay
Watershed.” The current goal for the watershed is to restore 10 percent of its stream miles. To determine what will be necessary for community organizations, such as Trout Unlimited, to sustain that 10 percent goal, research has been done on how present-day land use, such as urban development, affects streams and cold-water fish.

Leetown researchers have also examined how future land use and climate changes may affect reaching and maintaining that 10 percent goal. Land use and climate change scenarios predict that by 2090 the Chesapeake Bay Watershed-wide degradation in stream condition will range from 1 to 16 percent. Therefore, to meet and sustain the 10 percent goal until 2090 may require restoring 11 to 26 percent of stream miles now.

“These results highlight the inherent variability among scenarios and the uncertainty of predicted conditions, which reinforces the need to incorporate multiple scenarios for both land use and climate change in future studies to encapsulate the range of potential conditions,” Maloney said.

The local TU chapter is considering participating in Pennsylvania’s Chesapeake Bay Phase 3 Watershed Implementation Plan (Phase 3 WIP). It was created to reduce three types of pollutants, including soil from excessive erosion and nitrogen and phosphorus from too much fertilizer use along more than 12,000 miles of streams in Pennsylvania through 43 counties, including Tioga.

Phase 3 WIP specifies the steps Pennsylvania is taking through 2025 to meet local water pollution reduction goals. State agencies are working to create Countywide Action Plans with interested parties in counties whose local waters run into the Chesapeake Bay. These plans will outline how each county’s share of the state’s 2025 pollution reduction goals will be met.

REGISTER NOW FOR THE FREE ASTRONOMICAL HIGHLIGHTS OF 2021 VIRTUAL PROGRAM BEING HELD FRIDAY, FEB. 5

Those who want to learn about the spectacular stargazing events coming up in this area in 2021 are invited to register now at events.dcnr.pa.gov for the “Astronomical Highlights of 2021.” This free 30-minute virtual program is being held on Friday, Feb. 5 from 12 p.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Find out what to look for and when in the night sky, from meteor showers, to planetary conjunctions and even a lunar eclipse. Park staff will highlight only the best events that will be visible in the Northeastern United States, including this area. Also provided will be viewing tips for people of all ages from their own backyards. The short presentation, complete with visuals of what people might see in the night sky for each event, will be followed by an open Question & Answer session.

This program will be held virtually via Microsoft Teams. It will NOT take place face-to-face in Cherry Springs State Park, which is 12 miles from Galeton and 15 miles from Coudersport in Potter County. No in-person programs are being held at any Pennsylvania state park until after March 31.

For more information, call Tim Morey at (570) 724-8561 or email tmorey@pa.gov.

MT. TOM CHALLENGE FOR RUNNERS AND HIKERS IS SUNDAY, FEB. 14

Adventurous weekend warriors of any age who enjoy testing their skills are invited to participate in the Mt. Tom Challenge on Sunday, Feb. 14. It is free and open to anyone who wants to give it a try. Sponsor is the Tyoga Running Club based in Wellsboro.

Registration from 8 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. and the 9 a.m. start are both at the bottom of Mt. Tom. Participants run, climb or scramble up Mt. Tom’s 1,100 vertical feet of trail to its summit. After catching their breath and taking in views of the Pennsylvania Grand Canyon and west nearly to Galeton, they continue a short distance along the ridge before descending Mt. Tom using a forest road.

The challenge is to complete one lap up and down the mountain regardless of weather conditions. “This can be considered an adventure race, a run or a climb,” said Tim Morey, one of the organizers. “It is for serious runners; not beginners. There are no prizes, no swag bag or T-shirt. This is a no frills event. It’s a great way to get out on the trails in winter.”

Many of those who complete one lap decide to do it again. “Some people may choose to do that as a personal challenge to see how many laps they can do,” Morey said. Participants can start a lap any time between 9 a.m. and 11 a.m.

“Last year (2020), a total of 89 runners and hikers took on the challenge,” Morey said. “That was a new record – the most people to participate in our event.”

In 2020, seven runners completed four laps compared to 13 in 2019, eight in 2018 and 10 in 2017.

John Johnson claimed top honors in 2020 among the men by finishing four laps in 2 hours, 3 minutes, 18 seconds. Finishing first among the women was Caitlin Jones who completed four laps in 2 hours, 33 minutes, 2 seconds.

Matt Lipsey, the top rated trail runner in the country, ran one lap only in 2020 and completed it in 24 minutes, 35 seconds, the fastest time of the day. In 2019, Lipsey was first overall. He completed four laps in 1 hour, 33 minutes, 30 seconds. The first female in 2019 was Erica Anderson who finished four laps in 2 hours, 17 minutes, 55 seconds.”

Eric Kosek of Wellsboro set a course record in 2018 by finishing five laps in 2 hours, 23 minutes, 11 seconds. “Eric is the first and only person to complete five laps,” Morey said. Kosek and his family ran in 2020. He completed two laps in 1 hour, 22 minutes and 23 seconds. His wife, Becky did three laps in 2 hours, 4 minutes, 23 seconds; and their daughters each did one lap, Lauren in 1 hour, 8 minutes, 32 seconds and Kaci in one 1 hour, 8 minutes, 35 seconds.

The Mt. Tom Challenge course can vary greatly based on weather and snow and ice conditions at different elevations. “Some areas hold snow longer. Ice can be the toughest. Based on trail conditions, a traction device (screw shoes, yak tracks, microspikes, crampons or snowshoes) may be necessary,” said Morey.

Runners, hikers and spectators drive to the Pine Creek Rail Trail Darling Run parking lot in Ansonia in Shippen Township. After parking, they cross Route 362 on foot and go to the registration tent located at the bottom of the trail on Mt. Tom. When registrants finish a lap, they can go to the tent for free snacks and beverages.

To get to Darling Run from Wellsboro or Galeton, take Route 6, turn onto Route 362 and drive about 1.5 miles to Darling Run.

For more information about the Mt. Tom Challenge, email the Tyoga Running Club at run4trc@gmail.com or call Morey at (570) 724-8561.