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Laurel Health – Rescue Your Resolutions!

by Kristy Warren - February 12, 2016

This time of year, people are still working through their New Year’s health resolutions. But as January slips away, it can get increasingly harder to keep those resolutions going strong. When it comes to sticking to a healthy new routine, registered dietitian and diabetes educator, Kim Steinbacher, suggests keeping goals small and simple. It’s easy to “fall off the wagon” when making big resolutions and expecting lightning fast results. However, small changes to our daily habits—such as increasing our portion of vegetables at dinner or going for a walk during our work break—can lead to permanent, sustainable lifestyle changes.

For example, when it comes to exercise, try for a fun activity. Think outside of the box for enjoyable ways to get moving. You can play tag with the kids, walk the dog, or go for a swim. Exercise reduces stress and increases endorphins. Shoot for at least 150 minutes each week for health improvement—about 20 minutes each day. Can’t spare a 20-minute block? Try splitting up your exercise into mini-sessions.

Finding ways to eat healthy when dining out or dealing with a picky eater can also be challenging. When out to eat, remember to consider your portion size. Try sharing an entrée with a family member, or plan to save part of your meal for leftovers. Use your internal hunger as a guide—when you’ve satiated your hunger, save the rest for later, rather than eating until you’re completely full. If faced with a picky eater, employ the rule “try, try again.” Every seven years we get a new set of taste buds, and it can take up to ten times trying a new food for us to develop a taste for it. Encouraging kids to participate in meal selection and preparation often engages them and inspires them to try the new dish.

Kim Miller is a registered dietitian and diabetes educator with 28 years of experience. She provides individual diabetes self-management training and Medical Nutrition Therapy for a variety of health conditions at the Laurel Health Centers. With six locations throughout Tioga County, the Laurel Health Centers aim to make our community healthier by working closely with patients to improve their overall wellness and manage conditions proactively. To learn more, visit laurelhc.org or call 570-724-1010. Medical Nutrition Therapy requires a physician referral, so talk with your family doctor about your interest.

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Writing: N/A

Produced by Vogt Media